Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Drone Helicopters

Drone helicopters are increasing in popularity every single year, mainly because of the advances in technology that makes them so appealing but also because they are hitting the market by storm so are freely available. Most drone helicopters are quadrotors, which means that they are lifted and kept up by four separate rotors although you can get some that vary from this. For this reason, many of the designs are known as 'quadcopters' which is an amalgamation of the two.

These devices normally use two different sets of propellers; one set of two will go clockwise with the other set going counter-clockwise. This keeps the device stable when in the air and able to quickly change direction in all conditions. Due to the success of the drones, production actually begun on a larger scale version of the quadcopters but ultimately ended in failure. At first, many people believed that a helicopter would benefit from the counteracting rotors instead of the front rotor and the rear vertical rotor (which actually produces little lift and therefore little help to the taking-off process). Many test vehicles appeared around the world in the early to mid-1900s and were, at first, a success and were many of the early vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) aircraft. However, this soon came to an end after many problems including poor and inconsistent performance. Improvement was thought to have been made a few years later only to suffer again as the workload of the pilot became too heavy.

With advancements in technology in recent years, quadcopters have benefitted hugely from additions such as cameras, GPS as well as better and more efficient designs that now allow the user to use the drone inside and outside. These devices are now small and lightweight making it easier to carry around as well as fly. Quadcopters have also been used for research into unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) as a result of their efficiency.

Quadcopters are often cheaper than original remote control helicopters because of their size and their lower cost of production. They are also known for causing less damage because they have smaller blades meaning that they produce less kinetic energy. The risk of any damage can also be further diminished with the addition of rotor protection that is available that will not affect the performance of the drone.

It was at the beginning of the twentieth century in 1907 that the first product of this idea came to light when Louis Breguet designed and built a four-rotor helicopter. Though it only flew a few feet from the ground a couple of times, it is widely seen as the first product of its type. It would take over ten years for somebody else to follow up on Breguet's hard work when a French helicopter designer built a number of different aircraft. One of which was made up of four rotors and up to eight propellers (which included many clockwise but also counter-clockwise). This device started with small flights but could stay in the air for several minutes by 1923. This was seen as a success thus being the catalyst for all future four-rotor vehicles.
To Your success
Perzina Munroe http://golf-post.com

Saturday, February 18, 2017

Portugal Then and Now

Portugal today is perhaps known for being out of the news rather than in it, but that wasn't always so. In the 1970s particularly between 1974-'75 the country was marked by political upheaval consequent to the end of the Salazar dictatorship and the end of its colonial empire in Africa and the consequent return of the erstwhile colonial settlers, also known as the 'retornados.' Perhaps unsurprisingly it's because of this that the country has adopted a more liberal outlook than other European states to the contemporary influx of refugees from the Middle East.

Political Change and Decolonization

For a time it appeared Portugal would replace a rightist dictatorship with a leftist one, but that didn't happen, probably because of the Cold War and the country's NATO membership. Whether the birth of democracy in this Western country was a 'natural' process as some observers like Robert Harvey have opined or engineered from abroad is possibly only of academic interest now, but what seems undeniable is that like its better known Iberian cousin, Spain, Portugal seems to have turned its back on a dictatorial and imperial past.

A Liberal Approach

In the present what is of interest is that Portugal better known for its emigrants has adopted a welcoming approach to refugees from a region that once colonized the Iberian peninsula. It has shown itself different from the rest of Europe in that respect as it did in the 1970s when it seemed to be a pale imitation of Nasserite Egypt in terms of the military's hold over the political system. Fortunately the country has genuinely turned its back on such tendencies. Of course the refugees have trickled into Portugal only in small quantities, preferring richer members of the E.U. Nevertheless despite being a small country and not as rich as some other European countries, Portugal's welcome of foreigners in its midst is quite path breaking even if the primary possibilities for them in that small nation are principally centered on rural areas such as farm labor. Be that as it may we can learn many things from Portugal, namely that we are all part of a common humanity and that the barriers that separate nations are not impenetrable neither by circumstances nor indeed of history.

Portugal Today

Portugal of course has some advantages over more complex and diverse countries in being relatively homogenous with a single language. Even the shedding of its erstwhile colonial possessions in Africa has complemented this tendency and has enabled the country to shepherd its modest resources while shedding the trammels of empire. It clearly shows us that in the modern world it's not necessary to engage in great power politics or have large armed forces to make a difference as Portugal has shown in its attitude to immigration. Moreover the abiding hold Portugal has in distant outposts of its former empire like Goa in India is shown by the record numbers in that state taking up Portuguese citizenship and emigrating.

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

A Review of "Spectre"

An epic clash between good and evil as with all other James Bond films seems to be characteristic of "Spectre" as well. That might seem the obvious but everything about this film has an already seen impact on any film goer, particularly if you've been following this genre since childhood as I've been.

This is despite a striking opening in Mexico even if amidst a grotesque festival commemorating the dead. This opening scene itself starts with an attempt at getting a prime villain by the name of Sciara who indeed does get killed in a helicopter fight with Bond. There's no real introduction or background to this scene and it's quite akin to writing an article without an intro, which as we all know will just not do.

Varying terrains

The film goes on then towards the bleak landscapes of Austria and north Africa though in the latter context we get a good idea of a rail journey across north Africa and I must say the train was distinctly superior to what's available here at home in India. Apart from that there's a certain absurdity of the whole train sequence as its punctuated by a villain barging in and giving Bond a good fight for his life whilst he's about to settle for dinner with his lady friend. In this context it might be mentioned that Bond cavorting with the heroine, whom he met only a while back in Austria too has a touch of abruptness, particularly when we note the meeting was by no means cordial. Though of course this is explained away by the bad guys kidnapping her and Bond of course successfully rescuing her. This about sums up the whole problem with "Spectre" in that there's no development of theme, it's all action from beginning to end as if somebody were anxious to get it over and done with.

Nor are the concepts very unique. There's a political touch as we are battling a terrorist organization and there's a move to have a globally unified intelligence sharing system together with a shake-up of British intelligence which doesn't however get very far, thanks to there being a wolf in sheep's clothing in the intelligence fraternity. Similarly there's nothing very unique about the "Spectre" organization being akin to an octopus. Indeed there's a vintage Bond film named "Octopusy."

Entertainment without logic

Thus "Spectre" is simply entertainment for the sake of entertainment and when all's said and done we might remember it for Monica Bellucci not showing her age at 51 and for Daniel Craig who's seems to be getting a bit old for this kind of role. As Daniel Craig himself admitted in a recent interview he's had about enough of performing the Bond role and it clearly shows in "Spectre" where we are led through a peremptory opening to an equally sudden end, albeit after two and a half hours. Therefore while the concept of retiring Bond didn't take off in "Spectre" and in some other Bond films, it's time might have about come as far as real life goes. After all if British intelligence can be screened why not try out for a change other comparable countries like Brazil, Egypt or Israel, for after all isn't variety the spice of life?

Definitely everything that has a beginning has an end and it's about time we applied that to the Bond series because the world has changed a lot since the first Bond film came out and making a film glorifying MI5 exploits doesn't make much sense today.

Thursday, February 09, 2017

Sally Hansen Microwavable Eyebrow, Face & Lip Wax Kit

Doing a poor do-it-yourself salon treatment can be embarrassing. Ever cut or dyed your own hair and had to hide it on the way to the salon to be fixed? Some treatments can be done at home by yourself without room for error. Sally Hansen's Microwavable Wax Kit makes it easy and virtually impossible to mess up waxing your own unwanted body hair.

We all have secret body hair we wish we didn't, and many of us have probably been taking the razor to it over the years. Although shaving unwanted body hair is quick and easy, it is said to cause the hair to grow back faster, coarser and with darker pigment. While that might be tolerable on the legs and under-arms, the face- not so much. My unwanted hair is largely on my face and toes, so I set out to find a reasonably priced home wax kit and found Sally Hansen's Microwavable Eyebrow, Face & Lip Wax Kit. It seemed to be an all-inclusive, easy kit and it proved itself to be!

Included in the kit is a small tub of conveniently microwavable wax, a skin soothing lotion, applicator, brow guide and small tweezers. I microwaved the small tub for a few minutes until the wax is visibly melted and then apply to my favorite waxable areas, take a deep breath and then rip off! No strips necessary! My favorite waxables are under and in between my brows, my "side burns", upper lip and the top of my toes. I learned a lot about proper waxing technique from the instruction guide. Apply wax and remove one at a time and apply wax in the direction of the hair, but rip off in the opposite. The box says results last up to 8 weeks, to that I say; results vary. Your body hair will grow back at different times in different places, but it surely does stay unsightly for a long time. It's been 3 weeks since I last waxed and my eyebrow hairs have been coming in since the second week, but my "side burn" hair has not come in at all.

For less than 10 dollars, I have used this same kit for a few years on my favorite waxable body parts and I'm thankful it's in my medicine cabinet for when I want to get detailed. It's easy to use and enhances my efforts in all my beauty treatments, from up-dos to pedicures. It's small and so convenient that I can throw it in my bag on my way to work or to stay overnight at a friend's. It's even within the guidelines to travel because it's less than 3 ounces. I think both men and women could benefit from keeping this in their home.

Ivy Brooks works as a freelance copywriter using the art of language to achieve the business goals of her clients. In her spare time she takes classes about writing, internet marketing, business and various topics and writes creatively to expand her portfolio. She welcomes you to contact her for a free consultation about your current project or business and how she can assist you with her talents. Her email is thecopywritertoknow@gmail.com

Saturday, February 04, 2017

Knowing When To Shut Up Has Become One Of My Super Powers

Wisdom comes with experience, a willingness to learn, to admit when you're wrong and be brave enough to change. One difference between my adolescent self and my adult self has been largely in my communication. Our innate survival skills require that we adhere to a level of selfishness as we grow, to make sure our needs are met by our parents or caretakers. The communication we use at this level is very much "me me me", "gimme gimme gimme" and less thinking before speaking. As we move from selfishness to contributing members of our households and then our communities, our communication needs to become more thoughtful, thinking ahead about what consequences, good or bad, will come from the words we speak. Obviously some mature more than others and at different rates! Beyond this is an even more rewarding and effective level of communication wisdom: Silence!

Here I've made a list of the power that lies within silence. I bet there are even more ways silence can work for you, but these are some I've experienced for myself. As you read, I hope you can imagine instances in your life it could have worked for you as well and you are excited to exercise silence in the future!

1. To relax
The first time I really wished I had shut up was during my first professional massage. As a young adult I wasn't very comfortable with silence yet so I filled it! By the end of my first massage I knew every detail about my masseuse's separation from her military husband and this had robbed me of any relaxation I could have achieved through the massage. When I later discovered I was an empath, I made sure I controlled how open I was to hair stylists and massage therapists from then on and I've even told them at the beginning of the session that I may just close my eyes and relax during my haircut or service. It's really added value to these experiences. You can't buy this level of relaxation, you have to shut up to get it!

2. To express disappointment
In a dispute with a loved one, it's tempting (especially when you're young) to throw something resembling a tantrum to express your anger and disappointment. This is reactive communication vs. pro-active communication. Reacting this way is more impulsive than conscious and only encourages your opponent to respond in a like manner. By expressing your disappointment and then letting the situation "breathe", you will likely have a better result; the other person can think before they react, coming to their true conclusion sooner and hopefully returning to you with tact, respect and maybe even remorse. After I found this worked with one person, I applied it to all my relationships; game changer!

3. As damage control
If you find yourself on the other side of scenario #2 and your opponent is disappointed in you and knows the power of silence (you've heard of the silent treatment), It's easy to grab a shovel and dig yourself a hole talking. Rather than being defensive and saying all that you can in your defense, you too, can let the situation breathe and return with a thoughtful, meaningful and memorable response that represents you the way you want to be represented, with dignity. This also works in scenarios where your opponent isn't disappointed with you, but you are not getting your way (for example, with customer service) and are very angry or heated. I have charmed the pants off customer service by letting situations breathe and/or "sweethearting" them. I have caught more bees with honey!

4. To get a better deal
Salespeople rely on you to act impulsively without thinking. Store planograms design impulsive shopping around the cash register to get you to add on to your purchase at the last minute. Ads print "while supplies last!" and "this weekend only!" to activate the panic that gets you to buy. This gives the illusion that they are in power of your shopping experience. Well they aren't, if you exercise silence! When I'm in contact with a salesperson who is pressuring me to buy now, I do the opposite. I tell them I want to think about it, sometimes I add the time frame of "overnight" and I'm often responded to with an even lower price or better deal, if not at that moment, the next day. Some may think that haggling better prices requires you to offer, receive counter-offer, offer, receive counter-offer. I've found better luck with meeting a hard seller as a hard buyer.

Ivy Brooks works as a freelance copywriter using the art of language to achieve the business goals of her clients. In her spare time she takes classes about writing, internet marketing, business and various topics and writes creatively to expand her portfolio. She welcomes you to contact her for a free consultation about your current project or business and how she can assist you with her talents. Her email is thecopywritertoknow@gmail.com

Thursday, February 02, 2017

Fantastic Four Review

Fantastic Four is finally out and was met with very harsh reviews. It was universally panned by critics and fans alike. It's such a shame with all the talent surrounding this film that they couldn't make a half decent film. Even knowing the film was going to be some kind of bad, I decided I needed to see it for myself. I went to the theatre with very low expectations and came out astounded by how bad the film truly is.

Before I completely bash the film, let's talk about what I liked about Fantastic Four. The cast, while severely underused and given horrible dialogue, I think they delivered the best performance under the circumstances. They don't make the film any better, but I believe they make the movie watchable. I just wished they were given the opportunity to be interesting. Jamie Bell's the Thing was also something I enjoyed. I liked his overall design, look, and voice. I thought the his CGI was the only great thing about the movie, but even it looked mediocre is some scenes. I think having detailed performance capture for him would have been an amazing thing to watch in the final film. Another thing I appreciated was the new origin story. I like the way they built up the movie. It was very based in reality and science and I though they did a decent job at building up to their super powers. I think they could have added some more character moments to build an emotional bond between the audience and characters, but for the most part it was passable. And that's about all the film did well.

My biggest problem with Fantastic Four is that the film is all build up. We get an hour of decent movie building up to their powers, when they finally do though, the film takes a nose dive. We get twenty minutes of horribleness which involves finding Reed Richards and the rest of the group being trained by the government after the movie skips a year. This was the cheapest and worst move the film made. Then the next fifteen minutes involves Doctor Doom infiltrating the army base and escaping back to the other dimension. Then we are given the shortest, most half-assed, cheesiest, and worst super hero film climax I've ever seen. You get a five minute fight scene with horrible action and no suspense. This fight scene is also the only one in the entire film. What a waste. I just don't understand what they were trying to do with this film and instead of using any cliche to help the film they decided to just give up on the film. It's a complete disaster of a final act, in terms of what the movie could have been.

Besides the way the film played out, you have no relationship building between any of the characters. You don't buy any of them as friends. Doctor Doom looks horrendous, good thing he's in the movie for only ten minutes. There's no action in the film at all except for the lousy end fight. We don't get to see the main characters learning their powers, let alone see them use them.

Overall Fantastic Four is the worst superhero film I've seen in the past ten years. Audiences have been given quality films with more mediocre source material than the Fantastic Four that have delivered Oscar worthy things. It's a shame director Josh Trank couldn't build on his success from Chronicle. Instead he most likely ruined his career, previously attached to a Star Wars film, he no longer is and all you heard about the film before release was trouble behind the scenes. It's just a shame considering what could have been.

Fantastic Four deserves a lousy 1 1/2 out of 5.

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